Should You Train Your Dog In German? | Coach Doggo

Many people choose to train their dogs in a different language. German is a popular language that people choose. Should you train your dog in German?

Training your dog in a foreign language is a personal choice. At the end of the day, the language that you train your dog in doesn’t matter much to your dog. There are benefits and negative aspects to training your dog in German. You will need to decide if it is something that you want to do.

In this article, we will discuss both the benefits and negative aspects of training your dog in German. Many people choose to train their dogs in German and have found success. You will need to decide if it is something that you want to do. If you decide to train your dog in German, you will need to commit to it. At the end of the article, we will give you some common German commands that you can start teaching your dog.

I have loved dogs my entire life, and have done a lot of research about training methods. At the end of the day, the language that you use to train your dog doesn’t matter as much as your overall training methods. There are some benefits and negative aspects to training your dog in German, which we will discuss here. I hope that this information helps you decide whether to train your dog in German or not.

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What Are The Benefits Of Training Your Dog In German?

There are many benefits to training your dog in any foreign language. Many people choose German as the language to train their dog in because common commands have a very distinct tone and sound when spoken in German. This helps the dog understand and remember the command better.

Along these same lines, training your dog in German is effective for teaching your dog commands in a way that is much less confusing for them. When you train your dog in English, it is likely that they hear commands out of the context of training.

For example, you might say to another person in your home that you want to sit down. Your dog may become confused when they hear this because they can’t tell if they are being given a command or not. This not only confuses your dog but can be detrimental to their training. The next time you give the sit command after an incident like this, they may not respond because they aren’t sure if you are giving the command to them or not.  When you teach your dog in German, this confusion is eliminated because it is very unlikely that you will use German commands.

Ultimately, your dog will not care about what language you train them in. As long as you use proper training methods, they will remember the commands that you teach to them. Make sure you use positive reinforcement and practice tricks and commands with your dog regularly to help them remember their training.

By training your dog in German, you can ensure that they will learn and remember commands much more effectively than if you train them in English.

What Are The Negative Aspects Of Training Your Dog In German?

While training your dog in German can be beneficial and effective, there are some negative aspects to this way of training. The biggest downside to training your dog in German is that no one else will be able to effectively give your dog commands. This can be an issue in a variety of situations.

If you ever have to leave your dog at a daycare or boarding facility, your dog will probably not respond to the English commands that the employees will use. This will make your dog look untrained or disobedient. The same applies if someone else has to take care of your dog if you are hospitalized or your dog has to be rehomed. If your dog ends up in the care of someone else in the long term, they will likely be retrained in English.

Another thing to consider when choosing to train your dog in German is whether you live with anyone else or will live with others in the future. You will need to make sure that everyone in your home is on board with training the dog in German. Everyone in the home will need to either commit to learning the German commands along with you or not giving the dog commands at all.

Once you decide to train your dog in German, you will need to commit to it. Your dog will get confused if you decide to change the commands back to English after training. Consider this choice carefully before finally deciding.

Common Commands in German

If you decide to teach your dog in German, you should follow a regular training plan, starting with basic commands. We have put together a list of some common commands to teach your dog in German.

When you teach these commands, remember to use positive reinforcement like treats or a toy to reward your dog when they do something right. Remember to take your time with training. The only thing that you are changing from traditional training methods is the command word.

The following is a list of some basic German commands to teach your dog:

English German Pronunciation
Sit Sitz zit-zen
Down Platz plah-tz
Stay Bleib blibe
Heel Fuss foos
Come Hier heee-a

Even though we have included a pronunciation for each command, it might be helpful to find an online resource for listening to the German pronunciation of each word. The main reason that people choose to train their dogs in German is because of the language’s unique pronunciation. Because of this, you will want to make sure you are pronouncing the commands correctly.

You can also search online for additional commands to teach your dog in German once they have learned these basic commands.

At the end of the day, training your dog in German will follow the same steps as training your dog in English, you will just be using a different command word. If you keep that in mind, then this task won’t seem as daunting.

About THE AUTHOR

Russell Wright

Russell Wright

I have had dogs my whole life and have always trained my own dogs with patience and positive reinforcement. My dogs are my life. My family always had dogs growing up. I've trained dogs for clients while working at a local dog daycare. I hope that my research and experiences are helpful to you as I share them here.

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